Sunday, January 13, 2019

How to manage a Proof of Concept



POCs as a concept are a response to customers getting oversold. As a vendor we’d rather skip the whole thing and trust our sales team to scope properly. As a customer we’d rather not spend time testing instead of doing. Sometimes they have to be done though, and it’s best for everyone to do it right. Right = tightly scoped and timeframed.

An ideal POC should look like a well-planned professional services engagement. The goal is established in writing before anyone gets on a plane. Infrastructure testing and go/no-go call Friday. Fly Monday. Kick off meeting Tuesday morning, installation rest of day. Wednesday and Thursday, go through the list of use cases and check them all off. Friday morning meeting to get the verbal, fly home, spend the next week with procurement instead of kicking the tires.

You should spend more time helping a customer or vendor define use cases up front than you allow for the POC.  If they can’t define use cases, you might still have a deal, but you’ve established that the product is not worth any actual dollars. That’s bad for the vendor obviously, but it also means the customer can’t get any internal attention for this project. Real use cases mean business value mean time and money allocations. If there is demonstrable value, there is easy justification for a fair price.

Given my one week frame, you’ve got a maximum of 16 hours for use cases. This is a bit more time than a circa 2018 Nicolas Cage binge. If it can be remote, great! Travel time can turn into work time for a maximum of 32 hours. That’s a play through of Far Cry 5. Planning ahead of time lets both sides think about how long each step will take. Estimate how long each use case will take to demonstrate, then double or triple that time. If you don’t need those hours, you’ll have time to get creative after the real work is done. Both sides should bring a punch list of extra things they’d like to show off or see.

This ideal model can have a couple of interesting wrinkles based on product maturity though. A young company with a single product has a straightforward agenda, but a mature company with many products on a shared platform has to pick and choose. Marketing being what it is, the customer’s excitement is also centered on the newest, highest-risk stuff! The reality is that these are things that haven’t been done before, at least by the feet on the ground, so they take even more time.

The only way to be successful in that case is to compartmentalize the platform use cases from the new shiny use cases so that you’re using the new stuff on a solid foundation. Everyone will be thankful in the end.

One last note on why this matters to customers; I’m describing the approach of quality field personnel, which is specifically intended to cast a product in its best light. This is good for customers because it makes the sale easy to explain and process. However, this is how a pro sales team gets their crap product over the line to beat out weak sales teams with potentially better solutions. If you care about the quality of the solution you’re going to be living with, it’s in your interest to understand and manage the POC process.